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Using AWS S3 as Primary Storage on Nextcloud

I have been testing/using Nextcloud for the last couple of months in hopes of getting rid of Dropbox, Google Drive, etc. I recently experimented with having external storage connected to it. That’s all fine and dandy, but then I wondered if an external storage could be used as the primary storage? A little searching revealed I wasn’t the first person to think of that. In fact it is supported by Nextcloud and is documented. To get started create a bucket with the desired settings and create an IAM user that has access.

The official Nextcloud documentation gives this example:

‘objectstore’ => array(
‘class’ => ‘OC\\Files\\ObjectStore\\S3’,
‘arguments’ => array(
‘bucket’ => ‘nextcloud’,
‘autocreate’ => true,
‘key’ => ‘EJ39ITYZEUH5BGWDRUFY’,
‘secret’ => ‘M5MrXTRjkyMaxXPe2FRXMTfTfbKEnZCu+7uRTVSj’,
‘hostname’ => ‘example.com’,
‘port’ => 1234,
‘use_ssl’ => true,
‘region’ => ‘optional’,
// required for some non amazon s3 implementations
‘use_path_style’=>true
),
),


Based on my experience using AWS S3 as an external storage device, I ended up with this as my config:

‘objectstore’ => array(
‘class’ => ‘OC\\Files\\ObjectStore\\S3’,
‘arguments’ => array(
‘bucket’ => ‘’,
‘key’ => ‘’,
‘secret’ => ‘’,
‘use_ssl’ => true,
‘region’ => ‘,
// required for some non amazon s3 implementations
‘use_path_style’=>true
),
),


Specifically, I found it necessary to specify the region (i.e. us-west-2) and SSL otherwise I got errors.

I have been running this for a few days now and have not seen any issues.

Nextcloud, Docker, and upgrades

I have been running Nextcloud via a Docker image for a few months and recently a new version of Nextcloud was released. This seemed like the perfect opportunity to test out upgrading to a newer Nextcloud Docker image and keeping my data. Since I mount a volume to keep the configuration data in, it will be a fairly easy to upgrade.

First step is to make sure we have backups and verify their integrity. The Nextcloud backups page details these instructions pretty well, but just to cover the basics you need to backup your data and database at a minimum. I also went ahead and grabbed a copy of the config.php by itself and stored it outside of the container. Tip: I didn’t initially know which volume store was the right one, so I entered the container by loading bash and created a temporary file named ‘findmehere’ that I could search for from the host.

Next we will stop the existing container by issuing a ‘docker stop ’ where is the container id listed in the output of ‘docker ps’. Then we will start a new docker image using the same command we did the first time. For me this looked like ‘docker run -d -v nextcloud:/var/www/html -p 8181:80 nextcloud’ but YMMV.

The occ script should detect the new version of Nextcloud and start the upgrade. Check the status by visiting your Nextcloud web page. Since we used a volume to keep our data in we should be all set!